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There was a person who made a circle to keep me out,
so I made a circle to include us both.

TRIBAL RHYTHMS / THE PROBLEM

Drastic economic and social changes beginning in the 1960's and 1970's, and accelerating in the 1980's and 1990's, have altered the way our children grow and learn. Community and family fragmentation, and the resulting loss of consistent value systems on which children depend for a healthy environment, have become even more critical and widespread. In some neighborhoods, gangs have become a substitute for family. Too many of our children are growing up racially and socially isolated and alienated. These conditions have resulted in the loss of a sense of belonging, low self-esteem, inadequate social skills, deteriorating academic achievement, drug abuse, violence, and feelings of hopelessness. These conditions shortchange children, depriving them of the skills necessary to compete in a job market that demands a high level of literacy, as well as conceptual thinking, creativity, math, science, and computer competency.

In addition, these conditions have shifted more of the responsibility for raising and nurturing our children from family and neighbors to teachers and others who work with children in schools, community agencies, day-care centers, and after-school programs. In turn, these teachers and community educators are forced to take a greater role in providing our children with a strong sense of caring, belonging, and community, as well as the skills needed to succeed in the 21st century. By changing the way our communities work with children, we can have a powerful impact on the economic and social well-being of the next generation.

So, how do we propose to solve this problem? Click here to find out what our solution is.